Historic Preservation

hISTORIC PRESERVATION

Asbury Apartments
2505 W. 6th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90057 97 Mixed Income Apartments Built in 1925, the Asbury Apartments includes 97 studio, one- and two- bedroom units, and approximately 2,000 square feet of neighborhood serving ground floor retail. The well recognized neon historic “Asbury” sign towers above the thirteen story concrete and steel building. Sixty percent of the units are income restricted, rented to households earning 50% to 60% of area median income. The remaining units are unrestricted and rented at below market rates targeted to workforce households
Bryson Apartments
2701 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90057 81 Apartments California Preservation Foundation – 2002 Design Award Winner Los Angeles Conservancy – 2001 Preservation Award Winner Southern California Association of Nonprofit Housing – 2000 Project of the Year Award Winner The Bryson Apartments project included the acquisition and historic rehabilitation of a 93 unit, nine-story apartment building located in Westlake/MacArthur Park. The Bryson, which is a concrete structure built in 1914, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Los Angeles Housing Partnership performed a complete renovation and restoration of the Bryson which included the reconfiguration of the existing units from 93 to 81 apartments, including approximately 24 units for large families with children. The Bryson houses the Heart of Los Angeles (HOLA) Youth Center in the ground floor. Heart of Los Angeles empowers and enriches the lives of youth between the ages of 6 – 19 by providing academic, arts and athletics programs.
West Hollywood Fire Station No. 7 – Apartments
954 N. Hancock Avenue, West Hollywood, CA 90069 3 Apartments City of West Hollywood, Historic Preservation Commission – 2005 Historic Preservation Award Winner The Tudor-revival building that formerly housed Fire Station No. 7 is one of the few remaining examples of small-scale, early twentieth century institutional buildings that were common in Los Angeles County.  Built in 1926 for a cost of $18,980, this particularly rare building type still remains from the early settlement of this area of West Hollywood.  The building has a steep cross-gabled roof, decorative brickwork, and woodwork representing the Tudor style.  Distinguishing features such as leaded windows, brick gate posts, hinged window screens, and original gutters and sconces abound throughout the fire station.  The fire engine garage provided a rather elongated space, accentuated by the tall vaulted ceilings. Such a style of development for an institutional building is increasingly rare, and with the disappearance of quality Tudor buildings the fire station has become a historically important structure.  The station building meets Criteria B, Example of Distinguishing Characteristics, set forth in the City of West Hollywood’s Zoning Ordinance Section 19.58.050.  Based upon the criteria of the zoning ordinance, the building was identified as a cultural resource in a mid-1980’s survey prepared by the City. The neighborhood surrounding the fire station had been predominantly single family residential in the past.  The fire station reflected the scale and appearance of the Craftsman Bungalow homes that surrounded it.  Over time, multifamily development began to occur.  The adaptive reuse of the structure follows suit by preserving the cultural resource while creating multiple affordable housing units. Fire Station No. 7 was granted a Cultural Resource Designation by the City of West Hollywood on November 17th, 2003.